Utility companies in the capital have been asked t Utility companies in the capital have been asked to explore what planned investment they can bring forward to help stimulate economic revival.

Utility companies in the capital have been asked to explore what planned investment they can bring forward to help stimulate economic revival.

The London Recovery Board has been set up as a collaboration of the London boroughs and the mayor’s office. It has asked companies including Cadent, Scottish & Southern Electricity Networks (SSEN), SGN, UK Power Networks and Thames Water to accelerate future investment where possible.

The Recovery Board said that where projects require additional regulatory approval, local authorities will look favourably upon any project helping to boost London’s economy.
A press release from the Mayor of London said he had “announced a package of infrastructure works worth up to £1.5 billion to help kickstart London’s economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis”.
In fact, there is no new money here, but the utilities are grateful for political support since they are usually castigated for digging up roads.
Ian Marchant, interim executive chairman at Thames Water, said: “As we embark on an ambitious programme to invest £1bn over the next two years to improve the water and wastewater services Londoners rely on, it is a real boost to have the backing of the London Recovery Board.”

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said: “The effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have been devastating for our economy and we face a long road ahead, but the London Recovery Board has made great progress in working with companies to deliver infrastructure projects that will help to stimulate our economy, create green jobs and support Londoners who have been affected the most by the economic crisis.

“It is essential that infrastructure initiatives are utilised to serve all Londoners as we work to recover from this pandemic and to build back better with a fairer and greener economy.

By working together with the major utility companies to progress and bring forward these projects, we have a valuable opportunity to improve the diversity of the sector and to help create new jobs for those who have been disproportionately impacted.

Utility companies in the capital have been asked to explore what planned investment they can bring forward to help stimulate economic revival.

Utility companies in the capital have been asked to explore what planned investment they can bring forward to help stimulate economic revival.

The London Recovery Board has been set up as a collaboration of the London boroughs and the mayor’s office. It has asked companies including Cadent, Scottish & Southern Electricity Networks (SSEN), SGN, UK Power Networks and Thames Water to accelerate future investment where possible.

The Recovery Board said that where projects require additional regulatory approval, local authorities will look favourably upon any project helping to boost London’s economy.
A press release from the Mayor of London said he had “announced a package of infrastructure works worth up to £1.5 billion to help kickstart London’s economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis”.
In fact, there is no new money here, but the utilities are grateful for political support since they are usually castigated for digging up roads.
Ian Marchant, interim executive chairman at Thames Water, said: “As we embark on an ambitious programme to invest £1bn over the next two years to improve the water and wastewater services Londoners rely on, it is a real boost to have the backing of the London Recovery Board.”

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said: “The effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have been devastating for our economy and we face a long road ahead, but the London Recovery Board has made great progress in working with companies to deliver infrastructure projects that will help to stimulate our economy, create green jobs and support Londoners who have been affected the most by the economic crisis.

“It is essential that infrastructure initiatives are utilised to serve all Londoners as we work to recover from this pandemic and to build back better with a fairer and greener economy.

By working together with the major utility companies to progress and bring forward these projects, we have a valuable opportunity to improve the diversity of the sector and to help create new jobs for those who have been disproportionately impacted.
...

The mysterious origins of Stonehenge’s giant sar The mysterious origins of Stonehenge’s giant sarsen stones have finally been uncovered.
A sample of one of the megaliths taken by a maintenance worker in 1958 has revealed the 20-tonne stones come from West Woods – just 15 miles away from the site, near Marlborough.

The mysterious origins of Stonehenge’s giant sarsen stones have finally been uncovered.

A sample of one of the megaliths taken by a maintenance worker in 1958 has revealed the 20-tonne stones come from West Woods – just 15 miles away from the site, near Marlborough.

Robert Phillips worked for a Basingstoke-based diamond cutting business that was employed to reinforce one of the upright stones with metal rods more than 60 years ago.

While he was working there, he took a core sample and kept it for himself – taking it with him when he emigrated to the US.

It stayed there largely unknown for six decades before he expressed a wish for it to be returned to the UK on the eve of his 90th birthday.

Experts have long suspected the sarsens came from the Marlborough Downs, but could never be certain.

But now the sample has been returned, non-destructive X-ray tests have traced them back to West Woods, according to a study published in the journal Science Advances.

The core was cut up and sampled for its chemical composition and compared with samples of sarsen boulders in 20 areas stretching from Devon to Norfolk, including six in the Marlborough Downs to the north of Stonehenge.

The analysis concludes that stone 58 – which the core was taken from – and therefore the majority of the sarsens, were mostly likely from around 15 miles north of the stone circle on the edge of the downs.

English Heritage’s Susan Greaney said it was a “real thrill” to track down the area that the builders of Stonehenge sourced their materials from in 2500 BC.

She added: “We can now say, when sourcing the sarsens, the overriding objective was size – they wanted the biggest, most substantial stones they could find and it made sense to get them from as nearby as possible.

“Now we can start to understand the route they might have travelled and add another piece to the puzzle.”

The mysterious origins of Stonehenge’s giant sarsen stones have finally been uncovered.
A sample of one of the megaliths taken by a maintenance worker in 1958 has revealed the 20-tonne stones come from West Woods – just 15 miles away from the site, near Marlborough.

The mysterious origins of Stonehenge’s giant sarsen stones have finally been uncovered.

A sample of one of the megaliths taken by a maintenance worker in 1958 has revealed the 20-tonne stones come from West Woods – just 15 miles away from the site, near Marlborough.

Robert Phillips worked for a Basingstoke-based diamond cutting business that was employed to reinforce one of the upright stones with metal rods more than 60 years ago.

While he was working there, he took a core sample and kept it for himself – taking it with him when he emigrated to the US.

It stayed there largely unknown for six decades before he expressed a wish for it to be returned to the UK on the eve of his 90th birthday.

Experts have long suspected the sarsens came from the Marlborough Downs, but could never be certain.

But now the sample has been returned, non-destructive X-ray tests have traced them back to West Woods, according to a study published in the journal Science Advances.

The core was cut up and sampled for its chemical composition and compared with samples of sarsen boulders in 20 areas stretching from Devon to Norfolk, including six in the Marlborough Downs to the north of Stonehenge.

The analysis concludes that stone 58 – which the core was taken from – and therefore the majority of the sarsens, were mostly likely from around 15 miles north of the stone circle on the edge of the downs.

English Heritage’s Susan Greaney said it was a “real thrill” to track down the area that the builders of Stonehenge sourced their materials from in 2500 BC.

She added: “We can now say, when sourcing the sarsens, the overriding objective was size – they wanted the biggest, most substantial stones they could find and it made sense to get them from as nearby as possible.

“Now we can start to understand the route they might have travelled and add another piece to the puzzle.”
...

We love a bounce back story here at Bluebaring Rec We love a bounce back story here at Bluebaring Recruitment.

After seeing its sales plummet by 64% in April, builders’ merchant group Travis Perkins is nearly back to 2019 levels of trading.

Travis Perkins’s sales in June 2020 were just 6.7% down on June 2019 to provide a slight lift to a quarter dominates by Covid-19 and store closures.

For the second quarter of 2020 – April to June – group sales were down 35%. Different parts of the business fared differently: plumbing & heating was down 48%, merchanting was down 43% but the Toolstation equipment hire division was up 16%. Toolstation proved resilient to the virus and the national lockdown, with sales falling just 1.9% in April 2020, compared to April 2019, before rebounding 24% and 28% up in May and June, well ahead of 2019 numbers.

Overall, group revenue for the first six months of 2020 was £2,780m, down 20% on the same period in 2019 (£3,484m) due to the impact of Covid-19 and resulting lockdown.

Despite 165 branches remaining closed in June, representing around 8% of the overall estate, Travis Perkins sales volumes so far in July are close to 2019 levels.

Chief executive Nick Roberts said: “Since the trading update on 15th June, the business has continued to recover well with good demand from RMI and infrastructure markets offsetting ongoing challenges in the new build and commercial construction sectors. We remain cautious as to the near-term headwinds facing our business and the wider economy, nevertheless the decisive actions we have taken to manage our cost base mean that we are well placed to continue to service our customers, support our colleagues and generate value for our shareholders.”

We love a bounce back story here at Bluebaring Recruitment.

After seeing its sales plummet by 64% in April, builders’ merchant group Travis Perkins is nearly back to 2019 levels of trading.

Travis Perkins’s sales in June 2020 were just 6.7% down on June 2019 to provide a slight lift to a quarter dominates by Covid-19 and store closures.

For the second quarter of 2020 – April to June – group sales were down 35%. Different parts of the business fared differently: plumbing & heating was down 48%, merchanting was down 43% but the Toolstation equipment hire division was up 16%. Toolstation proved resilient to the virus and the national lockdown, with sales falling just 1.9% in April 2020, compared to April 2019, before rebounding 24% and 28% up in May and June, well ahead of 2019 numbers.

Overall, group revenue for the first six months of 2020 was £2,780m, down 20% on the same period in 2019 (£3,484m) due to the impact of Covid-19 and resulting lockdown.

Despite 165 branches remaining closed in June, representing around 8% of the overall estate, Travis Perkins sales volumes so far in July are close to 2019 levels.

Chief executive Nick Roberts said: “Since the trading update on 15th June, the business has continued to recover well with good demand from RMI and infrastructure markets offsetting ongoing challenges in the new build and commercial construction sectors. We remain cautious as to the near-term headwinds facing our business and the wider economy, nevertheless the decisive actions we have taken to manage our cost base mean that we are well placed to continue to service our customers, support our colleagues and generate value for our shareholders.”
...

Good afternoon! We hope your Monday is going as we Good afternoon! We hope your Monday is going as well as can be. Let's soldier on as ever!
-
If you're struggling to get hands on deck this week then we're here for you. We've got a wide selection of construction and industrial professionals ready to help you get those projects done and dusted.
-
Drop us a call 01708 524 322 and we'll get it sorted for you.

#Construction #architecture #design #building #interiordesign #renovation #engineering #contractor #home #realestate #concrete #civilengineering #builder #constructionlife #heavyequipment #architect #interior #engineer #civil #work #constructionsite #carpentry #house #homedecor #homeimprovement #tools #constructionworker #build

Good afternoon! We hope your Monday is going as well as can be. Let's soldier on as ever!
-
If you're struggling to get hands on deck this week then we're here for you. We've got a wide selection of construction and industrial professionals ready to help you get those projects done and dusted.
-
Drop us a call 01708 524 322 and we'll get it sorted for you.

#Construction #architecture #design #building #interiordesign #renovation #engineering #contractor #home #realestate #concrete #civilengineering #builder #constructionlife #heavyequipment #architect #interior #engineer #civil #work #constructionsite #carpentry #house #homedecor #homeimprovement #tools #constructionworker #build
...

Kent County Council and Amey are collaborating on Kent County Council and Amey are collaborating on a trial to assess the potential of using drones in road maintenance planning.
The unmanned aerial devices could be used to spot potholes, assess whether there are issues with trees and streetlights and ensure the highway authority has a regular and better understanding of the condition of its assets.
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The trial is part of the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning & Transport (ADEPT) SMART Places Live Labs programme, which got £23m funding from the Department for Transport last year. Kent and Amey secured £2m of that pot for their two-year drone trial.
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With 5,000 miles of local roads in the county, Kent has a lot of highway to maintain. In the first six months of 2020 the county council patched 512,303 m2 and filled 43,468 potholes.
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Cabinet member for highways and transport Michael Payne said: “This is an exciting opportunity for Kent allowing us to have a much better understanding of the condition of our roads and assets across the county.
-
“For instance, rather than us having to drive around looking for issues or arrange to clamber up bridges, we can use the drone to quickly and easily spot any problems we might face. And rather than setting up traffic management and diversions to do an inspection, we can simply put a drone in the air – meaning Kent Highways staff can be freed up for other projects.
-
“With this new eye-in-the-sky technology we could have a quick and clear idea of what needs to be done, and where, meaning we will have the information at our fingertips rather than people simply reporting problems to us online.”
Giles Perkins, programme director for the ADEPT Live Labs initiative said: “ADEPT’s Live Labs programme aims to tackle some of the technological challenges faced by local highways authorities in the rapidly changing transport sector.
-
“The insights and learning from Kent and the other seven Live Labs, as they develop over the next two years, will be invaluable for local authorities and industry right across the UK and beyond”.

Kent County Council and Amey are collaborating on a trial to assess the potential of using drones in road maintenance planning.
The unmanned aerial devices could be used to spot potholes, assess whether there are issues with trees and streetlights and ensure the highway authority has a regular and better understanding of the condition of its assets.
-
The trial is part of the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning & Transport (ADEPT) SMART Places Live Labs programme, which got £23m funding from the Department for Transport last year. Kent and Amey secured £2m of that pot for their two-year drone trial.
-
With 5,000 miles of local roads in the county, Kent has a lot of highway to maintain. In the first six months of 2020 the county council patched 512,303 m2 and filled 43,468 potholes.
-
Cabinet member for highways and transport Michael Payne said: “This is an exciting opportunity for Kent allowing us to have a much better understanding of the condition of our roads and assets across the county.
-
“For instance, rather than us having to drive around looking for issues or arrange to clamber up bridges, we can use the drone to quickly and easily spot any problems we might face. And rather than setting up traffic management and diversions to do an inspection, we can simply put a drone in the air – meaning Kent Highways staff can be freed up for other projects.
-
“With this new eye-in-the-sky technology we could have a quick and clear idea of what needs to be done, and where, meaning we will have the information at our fingertips rather than people simply reporting problems to us online.”
Giles Perkins, programme director for the ADEPT Live Labs initiative said: “ADEPT’s Live Labs programme aims to tackle some of the technological challenges faced by local highways authorities in the rapidly changing transport sector.
-
“The insights and learning from Kent and the other seven Live Labs, as they develop over the next two years, will be invaluable for local authorities and industry right across the UK and beyond”.
...

Data supplied by a fuel card supplier show the ext Data supplied by a fuel card supplier show the extent to which the construction industry is getting back to its pre-Covid normal working state.

Data supplied by a fuel card supplier show the extent to which the construction industry is getting back to its pre-Covid normal working state.

Customer data analysis by Allstar Business Solutions reveals that an estimated 43 million extra miles were travelled by construction business on the roads in June compared to May – up by more than a third (34.3%) month-on-month.

Specialised construction activities (e.g. bricklaying, scaffolding) have witnessed the strongest bounce back to date (up 39.4% in June), followed by civil engineering (30.2%) and construction of buildings (29.1%).

Tracking the recovery from a baseline during ‘peak lockdown’ (week commencing 6th April 2020), the analysis reflects the easing of lockdown measures in mid-May, when the government launched its return to work ‘Covid-19 Secure’ guidance, and 15th June, when non-essential retailers reopened.

Across all sectors, fuel consumption has risen 109% between w/c 6th April and w/c 29th June. For the construction industry, fuel consumption increased by 127% between these two periods.

Allstar said that increased vehicle use could be attributed not just to more projects starting or resuming but also to firms following industry guidance to avoid public transport and drive solo to work.

2020 The Construction Index

Data supplied by a fuel card supplier show the extent to which the construction industry is getting back to its pre-Covid normal working state.

Data supplied by a fuel card supplier show the extent to which the construction industry is getting back to its pre-Covid normal working state.

Customer data analysis by Allstar Business Solutions reveals that an estimated 43 million extra miles were travelled by construction business on the roads in June compared to May – up by more than a third (34.3%) month-on-month.

Specialised construction activities (e.g. bricklaying, scaffolding) have witnessed the strongest bounce back to date (up 39.4% in June), followed by civil engineering (30.2%) and construction of buildings (29.1%).

Tracking the recovery from a baseline during ‘peak lockdown’ (week commencing 6th April 2020), the analysis reflects the easing of lockdown measures in mid-May, when the government launched its return to work ‘Covid-19 Secure’ guidance, and 15th June, when non-essential retailers reopened.

Across all sectors, fuel consumption has risen 109% between w/c 6th April and w/c 29th June. For the construction industry, fuel consumption increased by 127% between these two periods.

Allstar said that increased vehicle use could be attributed not just to more projects starting or resuming but also to firms following industry guidance to avoid public transport and drive solo to work.

2020 The Construction Index
...

Two months after the prime minister sent the UK co Two months after the prime minister sent the UK construction industry back to work and ended its lockdown, it looks like recovery may take longer than initially thought.
-
The risk of disruption remains, with delayed project starts and completions, and increased fixed costs threatening to weaken the industry.
That is the gloomy prognosis from construction economists at consulting firm Arcadis
As a result, Arcadis has downgraded its tender price forecast for 2020 to minus 4% in London and minus 3% in the regions, with the risk of further deflation into 2021.
-
The analysis is published in Arcadis’ summer 2020 market view report, Great Expectations?
This quarterly analysis of the UK construction market looks across sectors and regions and delivers a tender price forecast to facilitate financial decision making for projects and programmes.
-
It sets out a worst case  scenario in which a second Covid-19 outbreak makes it simply impossible to price jobs since the risks become unquantifiable.  In such circumstances, Arcadis suggests, any projects not scrapped would probably have to be on an open book accounting basis.
-
Now that most construction sites are operational, productivity has recovered better than expected, ranging from between 70-90% depending on the sector and the stage of the project. This has contributed to the lowering of prices, edging the balance of the industry closer towards deflation and offsetting some of the initial inflationary pressures from extended programmes and different ways of working.
-
The industry is now at a turning point, Arcadis says. Prices have been rising since 2014, but profitability across the sector has barely recovered. With further disruption associated with Brexit and changes to labour markets ahead, Arcadis expects that contractors and their supply chain will continue to take a risk-averse approach to business development – focused on quality work rather than work at any cost. 
-
However, this presents an opportunity for clients who are ready and able to work with their project teams to bring forward de-risked and deliverable projects.
-
Full article on our website bluebaring.com.

Two months after the prime minister sent the UK construction industry back to work and ended its lockdown, it looks like recovery may take longer than initially thought.
-
The risk of disruption remains, with delayed project starts and completions, and increased fixed costs threatening to weaken the industry.
That is the gloomy prognosis from construction economists at consulting firm Arcadis
As a result, Arcadis has downgraded its tender price forecast for 2020 to minus 4% in London and minus 3% in the regions, with the risk of further deflation into 2021.
-
The analysis is published in Arcadis’ summer 2020 market view report, Great Expectations?
This quarterly analysis of the UK construction market looks across sectors and regions and delivers a tender price forecast to facilitate financial decision making for projects and programmes.
-
It sets out a worst case  scenario in which a second Covid-19 outbreak makes it simply impossible to price jobs since the risks become unquantifiable.  In such circumstances, Arcadis suggests, any projects not scrapped would probably have to be on an open book accounting basis.
-
Now that most construction sites are operational, productivity has recovered better than expected, ranging from between 70-90% depending on the sector and the stage of the project. This has contributed to the lowering of prices, edging the balance of the industry closer towards deflation and offsetting some of the initial inflationary pressures from extended programmes and different ways of working.
-
The industry is now at a turning point, Arcadis says. Prices have been rising since 2014, but profitability across the sector has barely recovered. With further disruption associated with Brexit and changes to labour markets ahead, Arcadis expects that contractors and their supply chain will continue to take a risk-averse approach to business development – focused on quality work rather than work at any cost.
-
However, this presents an opportunity for clients who are ready and able to work with their project teams to bring forward de-risked and deliverable projects.
-
Full article on our website bluebaring.com.
...

Today sees the publication of draft legislation th Today sees the publication of draft legislation that the government describes as the biggest changes to building safety for nearly 40 years.

The Building Safety Bill brings in new regulations in the wake of the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire and subsequent report into systemic failings by Dame Judith Hackitt.

If and when the bill is enacted, people living in high rise buildings will be empowered to challenge inaction from their building owner and have better access to safety information about their building. They will also have access to a complaints process.

The draft bill will also give the government new powers to regulate construction materials and products.

High-rise remains defined as at least 18 metres or six storeys, but – as with any aspect of the bill – this is open to debate and amendment during the passage of the legislation through parliament.

Full article on our website

Today sees the publication of draft legislation that the government describes as the biggest changes to building safety for nearly 40 years.

The Building Safety Bill brings in new regulations in the wake of the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire and subsequent report into systemic failings by Dame Judith Hackitt.

If and when the bill is enacted, people living in high rise buildings will be empowered to challenge inaction from their building owner and have better access to safety information about their building. They will also have access to a complaints process.

The draft bill will also give the government new powers to regulate construction materials and products.

High-rise remains defined as at least 18 metres or six storeys, but – as with any aspect of the bill – this is open to debate and amendment during the passage of the legislation through parliament.

Full article on our website
...

The government’s Self-Employment Income Support The government’s Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has been used by more people in the construction industry than any other sector. 
The government’s Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has been used by more people in the construction industry than any other sector.
Roughly one in three beneficiaries of SEISS work in construction, but given that no industry has more self-employed than construction and 59% of the industry was furloughed at some time during the lockdown and unable to work, this should be no surprise.
According to latest government data, 1,064,000 construction workers were eligible for SEISS grants to help them through the economic inactivity of the coronavirus lockdown. From these, 867,000 claims have been made, collectively getting £3,059m at an average of £3,500 each, as of 30th June.
The total payout for all self-employed people under SEISS to 30th June was £7.4bn, so construction has taken 40% of the pot.
The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) was announced on 26th March 2020 as part of the UK government’s support package for businesses and self-employed people during the coronavirus outbreak in early 2020.

#Recruitment #Construction #Industrial #Builder #Labourer #Painter #Driver #Decorator #Resume #Careers #Essex #London #Contractors #Plumbers #Employment #Loyalty #Apprenticeships #Innovation #Roofer #Scaffolder #Tiler #Groundworker #Plasterer #Bricklayer #Carpenter #Handyman #Skilled #Pipefitter #Bluebaring #WeRecruit

The government’s Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has been used by more people in the construction industry than any other sector.
The government’s Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has been used by more people in the construction industry than any other sector.
Roughly one in three beneficiaries of SEISS work in construction, but given that no industry has more self-employed than construction and 59% of the industry was furloughed at some time during the lockdown and unable to work, this should be no surprise.
According to latest government data, 1,064,000 construction workers were eligible for SEISS grants to help them through the economic inactivity of the coronavirus lockdown. From these, 867,000 claims have been made, collectively getting £3,059m at an average of £3,500 each, as of 30th June.
The total payout for all self-employed people under SEISS to 30th June was £7.4bn, so construction has taken 40% of the pot.
The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) was announced on 26th March 2020 as part of the UK government’s support package for businesses and self-employed people during the coronavirus outbreak in early 2020.

#Recruitment #Construction #Industrial #Builder #Labourer #Painter #Driver #Decorator #Resume #Careers #Essex #London #Contractors #Plumbers #Employment #Loyalty #Apprenticeships #Innovation #Roofer #Scaffolder #Tiler #Groundworker #Plasterer #Bricklayer #Carpenter #Handyman #Skilled #Pipefitter #Bluebaring #WeRecruit
...

Bluebaring Industrial - driving the country forwar Bluebaring Industrial - driving the country forwards 🙌🏻 Some exciting announcements on the horizon. Construction 🚧 or industrial 🏭 We’re here for you 🙌🏻🙌🏻

Bluebaring Industrial - driving the country forwards 🙌🏻 Some exciting announcements on the horizon. Construction 🚧 or industrial 🏭 We’re here for you 🙌🏻🙌🏻 ...

Need to get that construction project nailed down Need to get that construction project nailed down this week? Staff shortages in your warehouse? 
-
We’ve got staff ready at short notice ready to help you get those jobs over the line🙌🏻
-
📞  Call us on 01708 524 332 to get the ball rolling 👍🏻

Need to get that construction project nailed down this week? Staff shortages in your warehouse?
-
We’ve got staff ready at short notice ready to help you get those jobs over the line🙌🏻
-
📞 Call us on 01708 524 332 to get the ball rolling 👍🏻
...

As debate and confusion surrounding the wearing of As debate and confusion surrounding the wearing of face masks in public continues to grow, inconsistencies among construction contractors is to be expected.

As debate and confusion surrounding the wearing of face masks in public continues to grow, inconsistencies among construction contractors is to be expected.
Last week the World Health Organization (WHO) said that face masks should be worn in public where social distancing is not possible to help stop the spread of coronavirus. Face coverings are now compulsory on public transport in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and in shops in Scotland
But Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove told television viewers at the weekend that the UK government does not think face coverings should be mandatory in shops in England.
Now, a survey of 33 of Britain’s biggest contractors reveals that most, but not all, expect workers to wear face masks when within two meters of each other, but the type and quality of face masks that they supply varies considerably.
The latest government guidance includes a section on personal protective equipment (PPE) and face coverings. It says: “When managing the risks of Covid-19, additional PPE beyond what you usually wear will not be beneficial in the majority of workplaces.
“Workplaces should not encourage the precautionary use of extra PPE to protect against Covid-19 outside clinical settings or when responding to a suspected or confirmed case of Covid-19. Unless you are in a situation where the risk of Covid -19 transmission is very high, your risk assessment should reflect the fact that the role of PPE in providing additional protection is extremely limited.

“The evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you, but it may protect others if you are infected but have not developed symptoms. However workers and visitors who want to wear a face covering should be allowed to do so.”

#Recruitment #Construction #Industrial #Builder #Labourer #Painter #Driver #Decorator #Resume #Careers #Essex #London #Contractors #Plumbers #Employment #Loyalty #Apprenticeships #Innovation #Roofer #Scaffolder #Tiler #Groundworker #Plasterer #Bricklayer #Carpenter #Handyman #Skilled

As debate and confusion surrounding the wearing of face masks in public continues to grow, inconsistencies among construction contractors is to be expected.

As debate and confusion surrounding the wearing of face masks in public continues to grow, inconsistencies among construction contractors is to be expected.
Last week the World Health Organization (WHO) said that face masks should be worn in public where social distancing is not possible to help stop the spread of coronavirus. Face coverings are now compulsory on public transport in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and in shops in Scotland
But Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove told television viewers at the weekend that the UK government does not think face coverings should be mandatory in shops in England.
Now, a survey of 33 of Britain’s biggest contractors reveals that most, but not all, expect workers to wear face masks when within two meters of each other, but the type and quality of face masks that they supply varies considerably.
The latest government guidance includes a section on personal protective equipment (PPE) and face coverings. It says: “When managing the risks of Covid-19, additional PPE beyond what you usually wear will not be beneficial in the majority of workplaces.
“Workplaces should not encourage the precautionary use of extra PPE to protect against Covid-19 outside clinical settings or when responding to a suspected or confirmed case of Covid-19. Unless you are in a situation where the risk of Covid -19 transmission is very high, your risk assessment should reflect the fact that the role of PPE in providing additional protection is extremely limited.

“The evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you, but it may protect others if you are infected but have not developed symptoms. However workers and visitors who want to wear a face covering should be allowed to do so.”

#Recruitment #Construction #Industrial #Builder #Labourer #Painter #Driver #Decorator #Resume #Careers #Essex #London #Contractors #Plumbers #Employment #Loyalty #Apprenticeships #Innovation #Roofer #Scaffolder #Tiler #Groundworker #Plasterer #Bricklayer #Carpenter #Handyman #Skilled
...

For more information please get in touch today